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Ucwedge
David writes in -

NAND flash chips are used in all sorts of electronics for storing information/firmware etc. If you are interested in trying to get the information out to study, then I may have something useful for you. This is how I read the flash chip without removing it from the device.

uC Hobby » Blog Archive » Read Embedded Flash Chips – Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. solderer says:

    This is a great looking hack. The jig will be really fragile, though. We’ve used the Tektronix probes made just for this purpose: they were very expensive, NOT easy to use and NOT reusable, either.

    One thing that might help is mixing standard solder with just a little bit of ChipQuick to lower the melting point. This adds problems since the mix is bad for wetting and reduces the strength of the joint. It does make the operating temperature lower which is good to keep from damaging the part & board & jig. Only using a little bit of ChipQuick gives you some of the best of both worlds.

    Also, emphasize the use of liquid flux & plenty of 91% isopropyl alcohol for cleaning, and to watch for the jig to dry off after you clean it. Also, to watch & make sure that cleaning alcohol doesn’t sneak under any nearby BGAs where it will take forever to dry out.

  2. BrandonU says:

    @ solderer
    Great points! One thing you can do to make it a little sturdier is to use a little hot glue under the wedge boards for some support. Not the perfect solution, but it can be removed without too much difficulty providing you pay attention to where you glue ( not on multiple pin parts, for example).

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