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flockbots_20071026.jpg

FlockBots, created back in 2005, were the product of the Evolutionary Computation Laboratory at George Mason University. The concept was to create an open-hardware reference platform for small, sub $800 robots that could be used in education and swarm research. I was noticing this afternoon that the project’s wiki doesn’t seem like it’s been updated in a couple of years, but the build information and pricing is still relevant. And they still remind me of a tiny Dalek army.

One thing that has changed is the available processor and motor controller technology. The original FlockBots are built around a 200MHz Gumstix board connected to an Acroname Brainstem motor controller. Peeking at the current Gumstix offerings, you can build your own FlockBot at about the same pricepoint using the 400MHz Verdex motherboard, Robostix motor controller, and a choice between a bluetooth or wifi uplink.

FlockBots Wiki – Link

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flockbots_20071026.jpg

FlockBots, created back in 2005, were the product of the Evolutionary Computation Laboratory at George Mason University. The concept was to create an open-hardware reference platform for small, sub $800 robots that could be used in education and swarm research. I was noticing this afternoon that the project’s wiki doesn’t seem like it’s been updated in a couple of years, but the build information and pricing is still relevant. And they still remind me of a tiny Dalek army.

One thing that has changed is the available processor and motor controller technology. The original FlockBots are built around a 200MHz Gumstix board connected to an Acroname Brainstem motor controller. Peeking at the current Gumstix offerings, you can build your own FlockBot at about the same pricepoint using the 400MHz Verdex motherboard, Robostix motor controller, and a choice between a bluetooth or wifi uplink.

FlockBots Wiki – Link

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