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At least this vehicle will not cause a debate about the source of the electrical power. You know, the one about electric cars still getting their energy from the grid. The SUNN is completely solar powered, and as the inventor states; “You get infinity miles per gallon”. Now, if it only had the styling of the Tesla.

Read more about SUNN – The solar electric car kit

Marc de Vinck

I’m currently working full time as the Dexter F. Baker Professor of Practice in Creativity in the Masters of Engineering in Technical Entrepreneurship Program at Lehigh University. I’m also an avid product designer, kit maker, author, father, tinkerer, and member of the MAKE Technical Advisory board.


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Comments

  1. Scott M says:

    I wonder if you could use this type of body for such a car without making it weight too much:

    “One-Off Construction Using GRP/Urethane Foam Composite”

    http://www.rqriley.com/frp-foam.htm

    It should be lighter than sheet metal, still have some crash resistance and would look a heck of a lot better!

  2. BigD145 says:

    I hate to see the term “infinity” used for a few different reasons. Right off the bat, there’s no such thing as infinity. Our sun will burn out not too long from now, on the universal time scale. The panels are only usable for about 25-50 years in this type of vehicle application. The batteries have an even shorter life span. I make all these points for one reason and one reason only: the ‘enemies’ of clean vehicles WILL use all my logical points and many illogical points to naysay the whole concept.

    Infinity-miles-per-gallon is meaningless. If you can use a 3D program to mill components, you can do the math to figure out an equivalent mpg.

    I love the car. These types of projects aught to be able to get gov’t grants. They can’t get that type of support if the language isn’t altered to fit the politics of this nation. It’s sad, but true.

  3. Volkemon says:

    From the FAQ’s:

    Question: How much does the kit cost?
    Answer: The kit is $4,500.

    Question: What else do I need to buy?
    Answer: Batteries and solar panel(s)

    My plan in light of that info:
    Go get an electric golf cart with charger and bad batteries for $1000 or much less here in FL(YMMV). Buy batteries and panels. MAKE a cool body, on top of a well proven chassis, and sink another $1000 in that because you go all out.

    You save $2500, but don’t get the neo-amish look. IMO, a benefit. Speed is about the same (20-25mph),and you can venture off pavement. Range? Hm. No idea there.The single panel is stated to have a 3 mile/day range.
    Maybe I am comparing apples and oranges here due to the registation issues, I will have to see if the EV’s I see motoring about have tags anyway.

    @ BigD145- $4500 that the kit cost, and a matching $4500 Gov’t grant, has $9000 that many MAKErs could use to build a ALL street (not limited to neighborhood use),legal, insurable converted-to-electric car or pickup. Over 200 EV’s on the road using $1 million in Gov’t money.

  4. Marc de Vinck says:

    @Volkemon

    You are absolutely right, it can be done for less. In fact I even made a post about an EV project a few months back that was really cheap to build.

    http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2008/02/the_672_electric_car_1.html

    There aren’t any places by me that you can drive a “neighborhood” car, so I would much rather make a “street legal” EV too.

  5. Volkemon says:

    Thanks for the heads up on that post, Marc. I was out of town at that time and missed that one.

    Maybe an ‘Electric Vehicle’ category in the “MAKE Categories” there on the right might be in order….

    Here in flat Florida (east central) the idea of an EV is looking better and better. No heat needed, and I havnt had A/C in any of my VW’s in 20 years.

    I am ‘lucky and resourceful’, so the article does apply to me!
    (seems the harder I work, the luckier I get!)

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