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solderSpool.jpg

In response to my latest Toolbox column, Mark Demers, aka SpikenzieLabs, sent us a link to his solder spool holder kit. The kit is a laser-cut stackable acrylic box that holds spools of solder or wire. You can buy a kit (for $10) or download the files from Thingaverse and cut and assemble your own.

Solder Spool Holder Kit

Gareth Branwyn

Gareth Branwyn is a freelancer writer and the former Editorial Director of Maker Media. He is the author or editor of a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture, including the first book about the web (Mosaic Quick Tour) and the Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Building Robots. He is currently working on a best-of collection of his writing, called Borg Like Me.


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Comments

  1. HURF DURF says:

    This isn’t green. In fact, its the OPPOSITE of green. Plastic? Laser cutting?

    You must give back your fake phony greenwhatever award now. Earth-haters.

    1. jammit says:

      I’m a little confused at your post. Have you accidentally posted to the wrong place? I don’t see anything claiming “green-ness”.

      1. Gareth Branwyn says:

        Oh, don’t worry, he’s just busy trolling. He means that we shouldn’t have won a “green” award because everything on the site isn’t green and this is an example.

  2. ramriot says:

    These take me back 20 plus years to working for BT Research at Martlesham Heath Near Ipswich.

    We kept our precious solder in holders similar to this, with several holders spread across our cluttered workbenches. So cluttered in fact that is was often much easier to place the holder on top of the power distribution trunking on the workbenches splashback.

    That was until one day when a careless engineer plugged in the power lead to some piece of test equipment, not noticing that a long wire of solder was left dangling over the socket.

    What resulted can only be described with the word “Skk-flash-BANG!”, the swift departure of said engineer to the duty medic and a memo the following day about not putting conductive items over power strips.

    Of course that never stopped us from enjoying our traditional sports of catch the charged capacitor and watching a senior manager play hunt the anoy-a-tron.

    Happy Days!