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Nothing sounds quite like a vintage amp for that old school flavor, and there are plenty of them online waiting to be employed. But when you get your hands on that oldie but goodie, you’re most likely going to have to do some housecleaning and resurrecting. Enter this “vintage” MAKE article from Volume 02, back in 2005. Brothers Tom Anderson and Wendell Anderson show you how to get all Bob Villa on that amp in their how-to, “Resurrecting This Old Amp.”

From the intro:

Musicians use vintage amplifiers for their uniquely satisfying tone. Old tube amps are expensive, but you can find solid-state models from the 1970s for less. Some audiophiles argue that transistor amps from this era have the best sound of all, because they don’t burn out like tube amps and don’t exhibit the crossover distortion found in many modern designs. We bought a few classic amplifiers on eBay, restored their vintage tone, and made them safer.

Tom and Wendell give you the know-how you need to diagnose, open, and repair that old amp and make it sound as good or better than the day it was made. Check out the project in full in our Digital Edition to get started. And if you don’t already own a copy of Volume 02, you can still pick one up in the Maker Shed.

Goli Mohammadi

I’m senior editor at MAKE and have worked on MAKE magazine since the first issue. I’m a word nerd who particularly loves to geek out on how emerging technology affects the lexicon as a whole. When not fawning over perfect word choices, I can be found on the nearest mountain, looking for the ideal alpine lake or hunting for snow to feed my inner snowboard addict.

The maker movement provides me with endless inspiration, and I love shining light on the incredible makers in our community. The specific beat I cover is art, and I’m a huge proponent of STEAM (as opposed to STEM). After all, the first thing most of us ever made was art.

Contact me at goli (at) makermedia (dot) com.


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