Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

Tokyo-based Ubiquitous Entertainment has built the iPhone ARider, a portable head-mounted navigation prototype. It attaches to a standard bike helmet and is capable of delivering visuals via a Scalar Corporation T3-A retractable HMD. With the glut of AR apps hitting the market you’ll likely see a lot more HMD projects showing up in the near future. If you know of or are working on an AR physical computing project and would like to share, please leave a comment.

21th Century “Chonmage” ARider [via zikkir]

Adam Flaherty

I make cool stuff and write about other people making cool stuff on makezine.com. If you have something you think I should see, send me a tip.


Related

Comments

  1. Neil says:

    Mounting an expensive phone (toy) prominently on top of the helmet is just asking for someone to come up behind him and just grab and dash. It needs to be mounted somewhere more inconspicuous and harder to steal. If pick-pockets can steal something out of your pocket without you knowing, this would be too easy.
    Still, HUDs are always military-chic.

    1. Colecoman1982 says:

      @Neil: It, really, depends on where you live and where you intend to use it. I’ve lived in upstate NY and, more recently, in multiple places in, and around, Chicago. I have never known of anyone picking (or trying to pick) the pocket of myself or anyone I know. The same goes for “snatch and grab”. I have no doubt that it does happen, but it’s no-where near as common as you make it out to be unless you live in a really bad area. Furthermore, this unit, in particular, is designed to be worn by bike riders. It’s hard enough to get away with something when the target is just walking. A person moving along at, reasonably, high speeds on a bike would be nearly impossible to rob unless you’re willing to make a huge scene by knocking them off the bike. At that point, we’re talking about one of those “bad areas” again.

  2. Anonalypso says:

    Could the iPhone sense it’s orientation in the pocket well enough to compensate the reorientation for the map on the display if the right code was written?

In the Maker Shed