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  • Anonymous

    So, “circuit bending” is the same thing as short circuiting a bunch of solder joints until the product does not operate as designed. And, crossing your fingers that you don’t destroy the original product in the process?

    Reverse engineer a circuit then make changes you see fit then I will be impressed. Until then “circuit bending” is tantamount to chucking the toy in the bathtub and patting yourself on the back because it does not work properly anymore.

  • Dustbuster7000

    Wow Anonymous, maybe you’d like to throw in a “get off my lawn” while you at it. It sounds like you are interested in the idea of reverse engineering circuits, so I suggest you look around online, there are all sorts of examples of this kind of thing, some more successful than others. And not all of this stuff is about creating something amazing from something else, a lot of it is about learning about electrical/electronic circuit design and implementation. Sometimes that means you break stuff, but if you learn something, some back patting doesn’t seem out of place. This link is specifically for beginners, people who are most likely going to let out “the magic smoke” a few times before they get it right.

    • Anonymous

      Same anon as above.
      You are exactly right dustbuster, there is tons of information online. This is why I was saying there is no excuse for the bull in a china shop mentality towards EE. One would learn more from a 160 in 1 electronics kit than you will by blindly shorting things out. I don’t discourage experimentation just saying this is an ineffective method to do so, if you want to learn about electronics. “Circuit bending” as described in the video nothing was learned.

  • Collin Cunningham

    It should be noted that circuit bending is not intended as a method for learning electronics engineering. Though bending may often cause experimenters to become more interested in practical circuit design, circuit bending’s predominant intent is to subvert preexisting functionality – to discover something new, unexpected, and unintended by the original designer. It is the potential of running into something strange and glitchy that makes this practice enjoyable.