Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!
TheGeekAtlas.jpg

Bletchley Park, the historic site of secret British code breaking activities during WWII and the birthplace of the modern computer, is again in the news thanks to John Graham-Cumming‘s book The Geek Atlas. O’Reilly pledged to give 50p per copy of the book sold in the UK to the Bletchley Park Fund and we are delighted to send our first cheque for £1000.



Unfortunately not everyone has heard of the plight of Bletchley Park. The Bletchley Park Trust is aiming to preserve the core heritage of the site and to build on the work of the wartime pioneers through education and technology innovation. The Trust does not receive on-going operational funding and therefore is dependent on money generated from donations or any additional on-site or off-site activities such as their online shop to enable it to continue its work.

If you’re in the UK, and haven’t bought a copy of the Geek Atlas, definitely consider it — not only is it a great read, but John and O’Reilly are sending a little love to this magnificent geek landmark with every sale. Also check out my review of the book on the GeekDad blog.

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


Related

Comments

  1. Rahere says:

    To be accurate, Bletchley Park was the nursery of the modern computer, not its birthplace: their machines were built and tested at the Post Office Research Station at Dollis Hill, in north-east London, and were test-run in a black wooden shed in the middle of the car-park to the rear of the main building, which is their true birthplace.

  2. solipsistnation says:

    We visited Bletchley Park when we were in the UK last year and it was very awesome. It’s worth a trip if you’re anywhere near London.