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Tokyo-based artist Azuma Makoto‘s works are usually of the botanical nature, like the painstakingly cut, twisted, and folded leaves that comprise his Collapsible Leaves sculptures. A few of his works though, like the Lego Pine, use non-botanical media to evoke visions of plant life. I love how the angular lines of the Lego make the piece look like a pixelated picture.

The Lego Pine would look great on a table next to his stellar astroturf-covered Herman Miller Aeron chair (the same chairs we have at the office here).

[via Colossal]

 

 

Goli Mohammadi

I’m senior editor at MAKE and have worked on MAKE magazine since the first issue. I’m a word nerd who particularly loves to geek out on how emerging technology affects the lexicon as a whole. When not fawning over perfect word choices, I can be found on the nearest mountain, looking for the ideal alpine lake or hunting for snow to feed my inner snowboard addict.

The maker movement provides me with endless inspiration, and I love shining light on the incredible makers in our community. The specific beat I cover is art, and I’m a huge proponent of STEAM (as opposed to STEM). After all, the first thing most of us ever made was art.

Contact me at goli (at) makermedia (dot) com.


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Comments

  1. Do you mean you have Aeron chairs in your office, or astroturf-covered Aeron chairs? Curious how that astroturf feels after a long day (or a year). Like, does it cure swamp butt?

    1. Goli Mohammadi says:

      Def not astroturf-covered :) They look really cool, but I suspect they’d be a bit uncomfortable after the number of hours any one of us typically spends in them!

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