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This product looks really cool! NeverWet is a two-part coating that can be applied to nearly any surface — cloth, electronics, concrete, and so on — and it totally repels liquid. It was developed by Ross Nanotechnology who licensed it to Rust-Oleum, and you can buy it at the Home Depot. [via C-Net]

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


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  1. Andy in Tucson says:

    And how is this different from the conformal coats that have been available for electronics since the Cold War?

  2. Bruce Miller says:

    STRAW BALE ! Rot proofer!

  3. chuck says:

    I can’t wait to play with this stuff! I’m building a new boat and this could be quite useful. Is it non-toxic? They show it used on clothing but is it actually practical in that application? How wear resistant is it? Does it stick to metal well? I imagine spraying an entire hull would improve hydrodynamics. Used with stencils this could make some awesome stealth graffiti. I see a really clever way to create ‘Slippery when wet’ warning signs in public places (or eliminate the need for them all together, but that’s not as fun). I love Rustoleum and I look forward to having fun with this new product.

  4. Sssss says:

    Does anyone know if it is non toxic? As I recall Scotch guard was pulled off shelves because the Fluorine content was doing bad things biologically.

  5. Cory says:

    I saw a video of this stuff (or something very similar) a while back and had one thought: what if you spray your work gloves and then try to pick up something that’s wet? Is it insanely slippery? Same goes for other possible applications – for example, would a treated floor be dangerous to walk on with wet boots?

  6. macegr says:

    This was all a long game to pour gravy on their CEO.

  7. Could you use this with airbrush parts, like the needle or cup, which would allow for greater flow of paint and no dry tip?

  8. Henk says:

    Here is a similar product based on nano silicium. This has even electrical insulation properties. http://www.bionictechnology.nl/gb-gb/products/index.html

  9. Demian Mendez says:

    Here is the link to the MSDS for this… I don’t think you could call it non-toxic exactly.
    http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/9d/9d28a478-3317-4f42-8418-9e000bdbdfe6.pdf

    1. The question regarding the MSDS is, how much of that is solely related to the solvents and propellants in the aerosol? Once it has dried/cured, what’s the risk then?

      As for other questions, how thin a layer can be effectively sprayed? Can you lay down multiple thin layers? Can you sand/buff down the result and maintain the properties?

  10. ral says:

    I wonder if spray paint would stick to it. It would make an awesome graffiti prevention coating.

    1. AC says:

      I’ve no idea on if it would technically work, but I question the cost effectiveness. One of the things I remember reading about it early on while they were still trying to sell it themselves was that the coating wasn’t permanent (though how long escapes me, I think estimates ranged from 2-12 months, but I can’t remember exactly, and the short end of that may be for worn fabrics that move a lot). I admit I don’t know the cost to clean graffiti off say a concrete wall, but I have to think that unless it lasted closer to the end of that estimate the cost of reapplying in time and materials would outweigh the cleanup. Not to say it wouldn’t be the best prank on a potential graffiti artist to have his paint completely flow off on application!

  11. Kurt says:

    I wish I knew how long it lasts. I have this sudden desire to spray my car.

  12. Jjh says:

    I want to spray my white linen suit

  13. Buy NeverWet says:

    I walked on water like Jesus thanks to NeverWet!