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Today from the floor of Euromold 2013 3D Systems announced five new 3D printers. We’re most excited about the desktop-ready ProJet 1200 Micro-SLA Professional 3D Printer. Retailing at $4,900, it is a bit more expensive than the Form 1 ($3,299) or B9 Creator ($3,375), but the ProJet 1200 features a new, one-step process that uses an all-in-one cartridge and curing cell, with all post processing done inside the printer.

The ProJet 1200 Micro-SLA in Action

According to 3D Systems, the ProJet 1200 is extremely fast (capable of printing 12 dental waxes or 5 rings in 1/2 hour to hour) and smaller than the average coffee maker.

3D Systems also announced four other Industrial / Professional 3D Printers. No prices mentioned yet, but they are “ready for the factory floor.” The ProJet 4500 Professional 3D Printer, which prints in full color plastic. The ProJet 5500X Engineered composite materials 3D printer a large multi-material printer capable of printing fully functional objects with moving parts (like a plastic race car with rubber tires) in a single build. The ProX 950 Production SLA Printer, which has the largest format production platform, was used to print a working drum set that was played during the announcement and the ProX 500 Production SLS Printer plastic printer. There was also a announcement that Geomagic Capture will be integrated into a “Geomagic Print” driver to optimize model placement for printing, fix problematic models, and allow users to assign properties at both the pixel and layer level.

Watch the Full Announcement

Anna Kaziunas France

Digital Fabrication Editor of Maker Media.

She runs the digital fabrication hardware testing for Make:. If you’re a vendor who would like to submit a tool for review (3D printer, CNC, laser cutter, fab software etc.), contact her directly at: anna [@] makermedia [dot] com.

She’s the section editor for Make: Skill Builder. Make: celebrates your right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your will. But — In order to really tweak and bend something, you need to understand it! If you’d like to write a tightly focused piece on a core maker skill in science / engineering / craft / art / architecture / robotics / fabrication etc. (whatever) that you’d like to teach to other makers — and have Make: work with you to illustrate for magazine publication — let her know!

She’s very interested in your ideas for practical digital fabrication focused books — anything that turns codes into things — hardware and software.

She’s also the Dean of the global Fab Academy program, the co-author of Getting Started with MakerBot, compiled the Make: 3D Printing book and ran the 2015 and 2014 3D Printer Shootout Weekend testing events.

She likes things that are computer-controlled, parametric, and open source — preferably all three.

Find her on her personal site, Twitter, , and Facebook.


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