batik-dye-tapestry_diy

This gorgeous wall hanging was created using a hot wax painting technique called batik. When the melted wax is applied to the fabric it seeps in to create a resist. When you dye it, the image you’ve painted will remain the original color of your fabric. This project works great for wall hangings. If you’d like to try batik on something like clothing that will need to be washed eventually, you will want to remove the wax resist after you’ve dyed your piece.

Here are some tips for removing the wax as a final step:

1. Dry clean it out. But ask first, not all dry cleaners will do it, and the newer chemicals may not work well.
2. Boil the fabric and skim the wax off the surface after it cools.
2. Iron it out between layers of absorbent paper (leaves a residue that looks like a grease spot.
4. Steam it in a steamer between layers of absorbent paper (won’t get it all).

Boiling is the traditional age old method. You will need a dedicated pot.

Important Safety Tip!
Don’t overheat waxes! Use a double boiler or something like an electric frying pan where you can control the temperature. If they get above 240 degrees F. they can start smoking or even burst into flames and/or give off hazardous fumes. If it starts smoking, cool it. Work with excellent ventilation. If fire were to occur, smother it, don’t use water to put it out.

[wax tips via Dharma Trading Co.]

Be sure to get yourself a dedicated wax pot, don’t go ruining your kitchen stuff! Check out your local thrift store for an old crock pot or regular pot (to use as a double boiler).

Batik-dye_wax-painting_  batik-dye_rit-liquid-dye

This project is brought to you by Kelli and her friend Nicole over at Kelli Murray’s blog. Check it out for the full how-to!