3DShook

As more and more users turn to design sharing sites like Thingiverse or Youmagine, the communities grow and more designs are available to the world at large.

The only problem? Not all of the users uploading designs are sharing good content. While these sites have collected amazing works by extremely generous and talented designers, they have also seen their fair share of unprintable, unusable, and uninspiring works. Sometimes, you just want to find cool things to print that you know WILL print!

Cool and printable is what the founders of 3DShook believe they can bring to everyone — a marketplace for curated, well-designed, 100% printable objects. Every model on 3DShook has been created by their in-house team of designers and modelers, who then pass it on to their in-house printing team. If a model can’t be printed reliably, it doesn’t make it to the marketplace.

I had a chance to catch up with the CEO and COO of 3DShook at the 3D Print Show in NYC this past weekend, where the company publicly launched. They explained that while their head of printing/testing might be the guy that drives them all crazy (throwing away large amounts of already completed work), his team is crucial to ensuring their customers have a great experience.

3DShook is a subscription-based service, offering weekend, monthly, and yearly memberships to users. There are a number of free models though, so you can hop in and try the site before committing to any kind of membership. There are also a number of nice, free tools that the team has created — that work not only for their objects, but also allow users to import their own models. Users can easily resize parts from a specific section of the model with their ruler tool (IE, measuring a hole, and then uniformly resizing an entire model based on the desired diameter of that hole). They also provide a tool for combining STL files that makes adding embedded or lofted text super easy.

With a large launch collection and a promise of at least 100 new designs every month, I think 3DShook is a great place for those with a 3D printer who often find themselves saying “what should I print” to check out.