HF Radio powered email…

Graph“Bushmail is worldwide Email that works via HF Radio anywhere in Africa. It allows 100-KB Excel and Word attachments and is powered by just a 12-Volt battery, with an antenna that can be suspended from a tree. It requires an HF Radio, HF Modem and an antenna, which can all be installed on an easy Do-It-Yourself basis. Bushmail can also be used in a vehicle, with a Laptop PC being powered and charged from the cigarette lighter plug. It is extremely robust and even works during cyclones and with baboons swinging from the antenna. Bushmail does not allow browsing the Internet, as it is purely just a highly economical Email system. The HF Radio does allow Voice communication as well.” [via] Link.

16 thoughts on “HF Radio powered email…

  1. eerm. I mean, To do this you must already have a Amature Radio licence. Also, There are many better applications and HF nets that can be used that truely go world wide.

  2. If you check out the legal stuff, you can see the frequencies they’re using there and they’re outside of the amateur radio allocated frequencies. Therefore, they are having to modify the Icom radio to work out of band and this is an FCC violation. Also, isn’t a thousand bucks a bit pricey for e-mail for a year??

    Check into Winlink, it’s a freebie, you need an amateur radio license and the same pactor 3 modem.. Winlink is being used in disaster situations by US amateur radio operators and is also being used primarily by ships at sea to send e-mail messages.

  3. Stating the obvious, FCC concerns are only valid if operation is taking place where the FCC has juristiction. Botswana is the name on the licenses presented. The fact that the frequencies fall ouside of the ham bands mean nothing, as other services are authorized to use the HF bands. Perhaps the frequencies and business use. listed adhere to international treaty. As I’m not going to use it I won’t make the effort to find out, as I’m not going to discover if bushmail’s use of the airmail application meet the terms of airmail’s creator.

  4. Stating the obvious, FCC concerns are only valid if operation is taking place where the FCC has juristiction. Botswana is the name on the licenses presented. The fact that the frequencies fall ouside of the ham bands mean nothing, as other services are authorized to use the HF bands. Perhaps the frequencies and business use listed adhere to international treaty. As I’m not going to use it I won’t make the effort to find out, as I’m not going to discover if bushmail’s use of the airmail application meet the terms of airmail’s creator.

  5. Stating the obvious, FCC concerns are only valid if operation is taking place where the FCC has juristiction. Botswana is the name on the licenses presented. The fact that the frequencies fall ouside of the ham bands mean nothing, as other services are authorized to use the HF bands. Perhaps the frequencies and business use listed adhere to international treaty. As I’m not going to use it I won’t make the effort to find out, as I’m not going to discover if bushmail’s use of the airmail application meet the terms of airmail’s creator.

Comments are closed.

Tagged

current: @adafruit - previous: MAKE, popular science, hackaday, engadget, fallon, braincraft ... howtoons, 2600...

View more articles by Phillip Torrone