Technology
Storage for components? Try pill bottles

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Here’s a clever use for all those old pill bottles, store electronic parts in them! Wackyvorlon writes… – “This is a method my friend and I have started using for storing electronics components. We have a bunch of old pill bottles kicking around, so we label them and use them for storage. We’ve found them most convenient.”Link.

Related:

  • Electronics projects @ MAKE – Link.

16 thoughts on “Storage for components? Try pill bottles

  1. That’s a great idea!

    I had never considered storing small objects in containers designed to hold other different small objects!

    I will be submitting an article detailing how I store larger objects in boxes originally used to store other different larger objects.

    :/

  2. You can also look forward to my article on storing multiple small containers in a larger container originally intended to store multiple small containers other than the multiple small containers being stored.

    A patent for this technique is pending.

  3. I wonder if you can go to a pharmacy and ask for any old pill bottles they have lying around.

    Well, of course, you could do that. I wonder if they would actually give them to you.

  4. Remember that plastic is not good for semiconductors because of the static electricity. I wouldn’t use pill bottles for ICs or FETs, maybe not even ordinary transistors and diodes. Resistors, capacitors, and hardware are fine.

  5. Remember that plastic is not good for semiconductors because of the static electricity. I wouldn’t use pill bottles for ICs or FETs, maybe not even ordinary transistors and diodes. Resistors, capacitors, and hardware are fine.

  6. yea so then what did u do with the pills them selves…..we are doing a project to find ways to recycle old never used pharmaceutical drugs and so far we have walgreens and wal-mart….trying to get satoris and kmart to agree to…but who knows lets hope it works…just writing to see what u guys thinks about it?

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