Tokyu Hands – Maker paradise

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Tokyu Hands in Shinjuku, Japan is a maker paradise – it’s called “creative life store” and on it’s 6 floors you can find just about anything imaginable – from an isle full of tweezers to the largest selection of paper cut-out models I’ve ever seen. Here are a sampling of what’s there – and of course click on the through to the Flickr photos to zoom in, etc…

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34 thoughts on “Tokyu Hands – Maker paradise

  1. Tokyu Hands is great and they are all over Tokyo.
    They can be a little expensive be sure it visit Akihabara 秋葉原.

    Enjoy!!!

  2. How did i not know about this place when i was in japan last month. I guess I will have to go back :). I did how ever go to the electronics stores in Akihabara. I though I had died.

  3. How cool! In the Midwest US, we have our own version- we have American Science and Surplus! When you’re in Chicago, Geneva, or Milwaukee make a pilgrimage, the hand-lettered explainations written on each item bin are hilarious! http://www.sciplus.com/

  4. Tokyu Hands has locations all around Japan, not just Tokyo. The one in the Nagoya eki tower is something like 15+ stories. Unfortunately, wherever you are, Tokyu Hands is expensive to the point of being obscene. It’s nice to look around or if you are in a pinch for something, but everything they have can be found cheaper online or at other stores.

    Also, Tokyu Hands is not the only chain like this, but it is the largest if I am not mistaken.

  5. The one in Nagoya is about 8 stories, but the rest of the mall is closer to 15 stories. I’ve been there several time. It’s incredible. I haven’t found one in Osaka yet… still looking…

  6. I looked up the little metal airplane models, and they are a minimum 2000 yen x 0.008988 = about $19.00 each US. At least on the microwing web site.

  7. I was at the Kobe Tokyu hands 2 hours ago! This place really is unbelievable. I go there like 3 or 4 times a week.
    And for bgraham111, the Osaka one is near Shinsaibashi station.

  8. The pop-up paper cards are called “origamic architecture” or OA. The designs in the photo are by the style’s creator, Masahiro Chatani, a retired Tokyo Institute of Technology professor. There is a community site with resources for OA enthusiasts (including links to other sites) here. If you don’t want to trek all the way to Japan to pick up a few of the commercial OA cards, they are available (along with designs from other OA artists) from the Evermore Design Shop.

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