Technology

The Touchmods team recently released a working version of their iPod Touch VoIP app, making it possible for Touch owners to place outgoing calls on the device.

The Touch doesn’t come with a built-in mic, so part of the hack involves either modifying a Walmart iVoice III mic, buying a Touchmods designed add-on, or building your own from their schematics. After that, you just need to add http://touchmods.net/rep.xml to the Installer’s package source list, install the SIP-VoIP.app, configure it with a SIP account and hop on a WiFi connection.

Incoming calls are not supported yet, and as far as I can tell this isn’t an open source project. Charlie Sorrel from Wired’s Gadget Lab describes it as being fairly buggy at this stage, and was unable to get it to function, but we’ll see how things progress after a few version updates. Anyone out there with an iTouch who wants to give this a shot and report back their findings?

VoIP For iPod Touch – [via] Link
DIY iPod Touch Mic – Link

2 thoughts on “VoIP on the iPod Touch

  1. Well, my new app, iHop, for the iPhone/iTouch makes me blueberry pancakes for breakfast. I haven’t released it yet… still in gamma version for now. It admittedly has quite a few bugs, and I haven’t quite figured out how to add more mix than will fit in the headphone jack, which obviously isn’t very satisfying. Oh and it doesn’t yet have a GUI. Or work at all.

    But you just wait. After a few minor revisions, this thing’s gonna rock. Just add me to your Sources list in Installer.App and see!

  2. this works so well i got it to work a few days ago and cyou get 300 mins a week free with freecall. Walmart carys ivoicelll in canada and usa. No i can have a cell in school without out it being taken away:) im 15 and i sauderd it and everything! Everyone should get it

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Technology

The Touchmods team recently released a working version of their iPod Touch VoIP app, making it possible for Touch owners to place outgoing calls on the device.

The Touch doesn’t come with a built-in mic, so part of the hack involves either modifying a Walmart iVoice III mic, buying a Touchmods designed add-on, or building your own from their schematics. After that, you just need to add http://touchmods.net/rep.xml to the Installer’s package source list, install the SIP-VoIP.app, configure it with a SIP account and hop on a WiFi connection.

Incoming calls are not supported yet, and as far as I can tell this isn’t an open source project. Charlie Sorrel from Wired’s Gadget Lab describes it as being fairly buggy at this stage, and was unable to get it to function, but we’ll see how things progress after a few version updates. Anyone out there with an iTouch who wants to give this a shot and report back their findings?

VoIP For iPod Touch – [via] Link
DIY iPod Touch Mic – Link

12 thoughts on “VoIP on the iPod Touch

  1. I updated, just to 653, without a developer key.

    Unfortunately, my hope was that in doing that upgrade, the “view source” would start working, but it doesn’t. Drat.

  2. @tdang: View Source will work in Pippy and Chat and certain other activities in the Update.1 version due out later this month.

  3. It cannot be emphasized enough that you need to get your development key. The XO can only use an official stable branch upgrade that’s been signed, the BIOS will refuse to boot into the latest joyride series unless you unlock it. Once you have successfully turned the BIOS security off, the XO will give a small countdown at startup to let you get to an Open Firmware prompt.

    G1G1 owners, getting our keys takes about a day and a half, so be patient. Once that’s all set, have fun with joyride, livna repository, and the fedora repository.

  4. I would also recommend that if you start using joy rides and developer builds that you get on the dev mailing list: http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/devel, and you get on the IRC channel irc.freenode.net#OLPC. This way if one of the builds is a bust you will know about it and you will also be able to contribute to the community if you find any bugs in the build.

  5. 653 does not need a dev key to boot

    update.1-675 (which needs a dev key) is probably the best trade off between features and stability IMO.

    The easiest way for new users to update to 653 (which helps wireless in general, and WPA specifically) is via usb with the files os653.img and fs.zip. Put those two on the root of a usb drive, and reboot holding all four gamepad buttons. That will clear out the Nand however.

    And also, Hi Morgs.

  6. The newest version as of release of this article was 656. I don’t know about the dev key as i have that in place already. Also MORE IMPORTANT!!!!!!! you need to update the firmware there was a serious issue with Q2D06 which the G1G1 shipped with Q2D07 is signed and Q2D08 is out but not signed yet.
    -=tbn=-

  7. there is a firmware update that is more important then the build bug fixes. the Firmware that most? or alot? or maybe all? of the G1G1 laptops shipped with had a big issue. if the system clock is reset, i.e. the battery loses connection, it will brick the unit. So everyone with a unit that is affected i think b3 or b4 units to c1(the G1G1 units) need this update it is super simple to do and only takes like 30 seconds. Q2D07 or Q2D08(not currently signed so it will only work with dev key units)
    -=tbn=-

  8. You can install build 656 without a developer key, and it contains the important firmware fix (Q2D07 firmware). 653 was mistakenly released without the firmware fix.

    So, if you upgrade at all, please upgrade to 656. Build 656 will prevent your laptop from becoming a brick in the future (after the Q2D06 bug is triggered, it would take physical disassembly to get the laptop to work again). Installing the upgrade merely takes running one command, “/usr/sbin/olpc-update 656”, at a time when you have good Internet access and AC power (like in an Internet cafe, or at home or work).

    I suggest applying for a developer key, then immediately doing the 656 upgrade, then waiting for and installing the developer key.

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I'm a tinkerer and finally reached the point where I fix more things than I break. When I'm not tinkering, I'm probably editing a book for Maker Media.

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