Craft & Design Photography & Video


The North Wind Blew South from Keith Loutit on Vimeo.

Australian photographer Keith Loutit makes enchanting short films using time-lapse and tilt-shift photos. It’s hard to believe these take place in the real world. Via Bent Objects

Learn how to make your own tilt-shift lens from Make Volume 9.

Look Inside >> 
Volume 09

Subscribe to Make Magazine!

8 thoughts on “Keith Loutit time-lapse tilt-shift films

  1. I’m pretty sure this was done with photoshop, and not with a tilt-lens. You can tell in some of the scenes that vertical trees are party in-focus and partly blurry (see the trees at the bottom at 1:28). A vertical object would not appear this way if shot with a tilt lens, it would either be completely blurry or completely in focus since its the same distance from the camera at the top as it is at the bottom.

    When the effect is simulated in photostop most people just blur the top and bottom of the image and tweak the saturation and contrast. Looking for mis-blurred vertical things is a good way to spot a fake.

    See:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilt-shift_miniature_faking

  2. I’m not quite sure how all this works, but assuming the film plane is vertical (parallel to the tree trunks) — If you tilt the plane of focus out of vertical , wouldn’t the middle of the tree trunks be in focus, while the top and bottom are out of focus? Top would be focused in front of the film, bottom behind (or vice versa, depending on the direction of tilt).

  3. Honestly, don’t you think it would be easier to actually use a tilt-shift lens than to Photoshop all 5760 frames of that movie? Not to mention all of the other films that Mr. Loutit has created?

    I can understand faking it for a few frames, and I know you can use batch processing to Photoshop a lot of pictures, but I think the simplest answer here is actually using a tilt-shift lens.

Comments are closed.

Tagged