Craft & Design
Pirate 2 Pirate Kopimi Station

Pir2Pir-Kopimi-Station-1
Pir2Pir-Kopimi-Station-3
Pirate 2 Pirate Kopimi Station. Aram writes –

The Academy Awards Pirate 2 Pirate Global Party was a great success! Part of the face2face/stick2stick craze is the “Pirate2Pirate Kopimi Station” at cafe MÖRDER, Berlin. Come along and get the files! Empty 8 GB stick required!

Obviously this is not something we are encourage folks to do, but this is a very good idea for art/movie posters and for content owners who *do* want to share their works. Does anyone know the make/model of that USB copier? I’d like to build one of these so folks can get all the Make: television episodes at Maker Faire!

18 thoughts on “Pirate 2 Pirate Kopimi Station

  1. Someone else started down the Arduino path, which got me thinking. A good approach might be to hook up a VIA mini-ITX computer with an old 20G hard drive, and store the 720p and 480p (and maybe 1080p) versions of each episode. And maybe different file formats too. A series of big buttons or toggle switches could be used (through an Arduino, of course!) to tell the computer which episodes and file formats to copy. (Some of us only have 2G drives and couldn’t take ALL the episodes even if we wanted all of them.) With a computer-based approach, you could easily rig up four or eight USB ports and serve many download stations from just one computer. Let me know if I can help — I’m planning to attend Maker Faire this year. I could probably also got our wildly creative local DorkBot crew excited about working on this.

  2. “Obviously this is not something we are encourage [sic] folks to do …”

    Why not? The idea of the public library must evolve into the 21st century. We can’t let Mickey Mouse tell us what the public library is.

    Oh yeah, the whole “content owner” stuff. Who decides where that begins and where that ends? The “who” and the “what,” and the “how long?” If it is the public that gets to decide, then the public has spoken. The amount of file trading that happens is proof enough that they are okay with it, by and large. On the other hand, if it is the profiteer oligarch that gets to decide, who is often not even the content producer but “their agent,” and incidentally gets to keep bulk of the loot (just think of the “Life + 70 years” rule in that light), then I claim myself the agent of the ancient Greeks, Arabs, Indians, Phoenicians, Egyptians etc. Would all of western civilization pay me 1000 years worth of copyright fees please? I am going to pass some of it on to the descendants of the producers, I promise!

    There is a story about the ancient library of Alexandria, where king Ptolemy decreed that all visitors had to surrender books in their possession to be copied for the library to keep. There is nothing inherently universal about the right to copy, the way it is perceived today. So if I get to pick which law is better, Ptolemy’s law, anarchically instituted and executed, sounds like good copyright law to me. It is true that the “owners” will make less money. But what makes it my business to concern myself with their profit interest, instead of the public enlightenment interest?

  3. @Njmalhq – while we cannot change what hollywood wants to do, MAKE can – and we did. our TV show(s) and movies are available for everyone to download and share – we are the first tv show in history to debut on iTunes, torrents, youtube, vimeo, blip.tv and direct download – soon on kiosk (like this one too).

  4. “… we cannot change what hollywood wants to do …”

    I thought the slogan of our times, at least to the extent of the next 4 years, is “yes, we can.” Not that I think “he” necessarily will, but that is another story. Of course “we” can. It is called legislation (or in this case, de-legislation). Hollywood, or Disney, or RIAA, or what have you, will have no choice but to adapt. Maybe they own the rights, but we own the rights to the book of rights. Supposedly.

Comments are closed.

Tagged

current: @adafruit - previous: MAKE, popular science, hackaday, engadget, fallon, braincraft ... howtoons, 2600...

View more articles by Phillip Torrone