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Battling Robots Shoot IR Lasers At MakerCon
[youtube https://youtu.be/ld-n2ra1IME]

One of the most attention grabbing displays at this year’s MakerCon is the demolished set of Seattle, on which radio controlled cars battle.

These bots pack an Intel Edison inside and an IR blaster and camera on their roof. You can drive them around, literally steering in any direction thanks to their omniwheel design, and battle against each other for the top score.

A camera mounted to the blaster not only allows you to check out a first person view, but could theoretically allow you to pilot your bot remotely!

Check out more at robodub.com

10 thoughts on “Battling Robots Shoot IR Lasers At MakerCon

  1. Maybe my problem is just my personal opinion of what a maker is and what makes someone part of the maker movement, but this just felt like a commercial for intel edisons and this company’s toys. I don’t like the idea of a convention being called MakerCon either. We already have Maker Faires, why switch to an overused moniker like “Con?” I feel like the maker movement just took a step backward. The guy being interviewed seemed much more entrepreneur/business man than an actual maker. I hope that’s not the case.

    To me, makers are about sharing ideas, the joy of building things, and doing things for yourself, not trying to market ideas commercially and get rich quick. I think we makers need to stand up for our ideals and don’t let corporations and greed ruin our movement like they have so many other movements. We’re not a fad to be monetized and then dropped when people get bored of us or advertisers stop paying. This is our way of life.

    Makezine has really been declining in quality over the last year. Did you guys get bought out or something? Has there been a change in policy? Especially your youtube videos just really seem terrible lately. They’re sensational and without much substance.

    1. Hi John,
      I built chassis and circuit design in my living room, in fact the first robot I built was using an Arduino. I am a proud maker and I have been advocate of kids getting into robotics! Lke you, I am very passionate about people building creative stuff. In fact, that’s why I left my cushy job to start Robodub.
      I hear what you are saying about getting commercialism in the way but we are a little company in Bellevue, WA which nobody had heard of. I thank Makezine magazine for taking the time to talk to us.
      Thanks,
      Parminder
      P.S> I am the guy being interviewed. : )

      1. Parminder,

        Thanks for taking the time to reply. I suppose my critique on you centers around the lack of access to your designs. I did visit your website before making my post, and I think that is partially why I felt that you didn’t seem like a maker in my understanding of the term. Most makers that I know and interact with are all open source/open design people. The Maker Movement is about that sharing of ideas. Anything that goes closed source falls out of the Maker Movement and enters the realm of entrepreneur/business. You say that you built the chassis and the circuit design at home in your living room; that is admirable and I compliment you on your skill. However, while that does sound like a maker, it could also simply be an entrepreneurial engineer.

        All of this being said, I do not decide who is a maker or not. If you feel like a maker, you’re a maker. I’m not trying to insult you, and I apologize if that is how it seems.

        I suppose my real critique is aimed at Makezine and the direction they seem to be moving. I think Makezine has been a great source of information for makers in the past. These days, however, they most often are shilling some kit that they want to sell you at an overblown price (often one they simply purchased from someone else) or are trying to bring in corporate sponsorship for their ever expanding scope of events.

        Money tends to corrupt movements when it is added to the mix. The Maker Movement has never been about money and I think it should stay that way. If entrepreneurs would like to start a convention for showcasing their ideas and start-up companies that’s great, go for it, but to try to appropriate the Maker Movement as a form of free advertising is disingenuous at best.

        Makers need to stay true to the movement. Ideas should be free and shared openly. This is why 3D printers have become so popular. Free designs were provided by people who simply tinkered in their free time. These are the true Makers in my book.

        Sorry to get all preachy, I feel strongly about the integrity of the Maker Movement. I encourage you to open your designs and join the Maker Movement completely.

        Thanks,
        John

        1. Hi John,
          Thanks for your feedback. Yes, we intend to release the code in stages. Actually, I think good chunk of the code is already public somewhere on Hackster.io. Our company is only few months old, we are slowly getting more organized as we get more resources. I promise you a lot more details would be made public in next couple months.
          Thank you!
          Parminder

          1. Thanks for the reply. I was afraid I might have scared you away with the length of my last post. I’ll check the link you’ve provided. Thanks a ton!

            -John

          2. FYI, the title (on the browser tab) of your website just says “Robdub” instead of “Robodub”. =)

  2. Nice to see our own Seattle Robodub battling at the Fair with Rambot and Edison inside. Yes, Seattle can be a hardware city as well. Well done Robodub! We are eagerly waiting for a warm home coming!

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Senior Editor for Make: I get ridiculously excited seeing people make things. I just want to revel in the creativity of the masses! My favorite thing in the world is sharing the hard work of a maker.

I'd always love to hear about what you're making, so send me an email any time at caleb@make.co

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