Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

516Mlttzzpl. Ss500
New RFID kit, “Tikitag”… Looks like the value here is the example applications and use of their web site?

The tikitag starter package, together with the tikitag service on http://www.tikitag.com can be used to create your Internet of Things. With tikitag, objects can be made smart and applications can become accessible via a simple touch.

Usage: From linking your toddler’s toys to Internet websites towards creating or customizing your own loyalty or renting service, the applications of the tikitag starter package are only limited by your imagination.

Contents: The tikitag starter package contains one USB RFID reader and 10 RFID tags (smart stickers).
System requirements: The USB reader works with PC Windows XP and Vista and with MacOSX 10.4 or later (Intel version only).
Technical: The USB reader works at 13.56MHz (High Frequency RFID) and has a readout distance of about 4 cm (1 inch) when used with the tikitag RFID tags.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


Related

Comments

  1. kaszeta says:

    This really isn’t any different than cuecat. Meh.

  2. Sean says:

    Why on Earth would I pay $49 dollars to allow a corporation to compile statistics on when my children play with their toys or how old the yogurt is in my refrigerator?

    Yeah, it might be cute to wave a teddy bear in front of the computer and have something happen… but all that data is being aggregated by a company that isn’t subject to US law.

    And since its passive RFID, the objects themselves can’t initiate any sort of communication. They can’t act as remote sensors or TELL the world about themselves… it all seems like a lot of liability for not much gain.

    On the plus side, the terms of service were short and relatively clear.

    my 2 cents.

    -Sean

  3. Sean says:

    Technology never ceases to amaze!

    We’ve graduated from optical scanners to RF scanners.

    Woo Hoo!

    Now a corporation can compile statistics on when my child plays with her toys and how old the yogurt is in my refrigerator.

    And… I have to actively scan the object to give them this information.

    I’ll pass.

    -Sean

In the Maker Shed