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High voltage electrodes immersed in acetylene torch flame produce a plasma arc, and superimposing an audio signal on this high voltage turns the flame into a loudspeaker at TX/RX Labs in Houston, TX.

[Thanks, Metis!]

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


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Comments

  1. Patrick Wheeler says:

    Kelly says the next step is to get better fidelity at the lower frequencies and stereo .

  2. John Stoner says:

    Let’s see it at Burning Man!

  3. John Stoner says:

    Let’s see it at Burning Man!

  4. cool stuff, sound from flame!

  5. J says:

    I sure wish they just let Buckley go for a minute or so, also not a lot of info on what this might ultimately be capable of. Neat concept. Can it give pretty good audio?  Please keep us posted.

  6. J says:

    I sure wish they just let Buckley go for a minute or so, also not a lot of info on what this might ultimately be capable of. Neat concept. Can it give pretty good audio?  Please keep us posted.

  7. Anonymous says:

    This is the 1st time I’ve seen this in the 42 years since I was in high school and did the exact same thing using a 400 watt PA amplifier and a high efficiency bunsen burner for the flame! My partner supplied the Johnny Rivers album and the flame speaker played Secret Agent Man which was appropriate for the times when James Bond movies were all the rage. Keep up the good work, young man. 

  8. b says:

    Dittos, I built mine in 1968 for my High School Physics class/ I used a Western Electric Tube Amplifier, furnace electrodes a High Voltage Power Supply and a step up transformer. An asbestos wick dripped a KNO3 solution into the flame (seeding the Plasma). The problem was that the Lab Countertops conducted electricity (a couple of minor shocks) It must have left an impression, I was a Contract Engineer on the Tokamak Fusion Reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. ps now semiretired Science Teacher

  9. b says:

    Dittos, I built mine in 1968 for my High School Physics class/ I used a Western Electric Tube Amplifier, furnace electrodes a High Voltage Power Supply and a step up transformer. An asbestos wick dripped a KNO3 solution into the flame (seeding the Plasma). The problem was that the Lab Countertops conducted electricity (a couple of minor shocks) It must have left an impression, I was a Contract Engineer on the Tokamak Fusion Reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. ps now semiretired Science Teacher

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