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littleBits is a system of electronic parts for play and prototyping. Designed for children, artists, or anyone shy about soldering, littleBits make electronics easy, fun, fast and accessible. Ayah Bdeir talks about her simple and intriguing system of magnetically connected, expandable electronics, which launched this weekend at World Maker Faire NY.

Becky Stern

Becky Stern is head of wearable electronics at Adafruit Industries. Her personal site: sternlab.org


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  1. Anonymous says:

    Perhaps one of the brightest idea I have seen in a long time. I grew up playing with tools rather than toys so early on I learned to do real things that were an exact replica of my ideas. I used to build with Legos and Meccano and that spring board with components sold at Radio Shack. I was allowed to play with saws, needles, solder, electricity, etc. which is more than I can say for kids today… There are so few of these landmark systems that allow for unlimited creation. This is the perfect toy because it is just the right level of complexity for someone starting out AND it is so ingenious in the way it is built (magnet connectors!) that I can see it being contributed to, modded, hacked, and therefore taken into completely unforeseen directions. As long as Little Bits continues to integrate improvements and release new or companion kits :)

  2. Anonymous says:

    Perhaps one of the brightest idea I have seen in a long time. I grew up playing with tools rather than toys so early on I learned to do real things that were an exact replica of my ideas. I used to build with Legos and Meccano and that spring board with components sold at Radio Shack. I was allowed to play with saws, needles, solder, electricity, etc. which is more than I can say for kids today… There are so few of these landmark systems that allow for unlimited creation. This is the perfect toy because it is just the right level of complexity for someone starting out AND it is so ingenious in the way it is built (magnet connectors!) that I can see it being contributed to, modded, hacked, and therefore taken into completely unforeseen directions. As long as Little Bits continues to integrate improvements and release new or companion kits :)

  3. Anonymous says:

    Perhaps one of the brightest idea I have seen in a long time. I grew up playing with tools rather than toys so early on I learned to do real things that were an exact replica of my ideas. I used to build with Legos and Meccano and that spring board with components sold at Radio Shack. I was allowed to play with saws, needles, solder, electricity, etc. which is more than I can say for kids today… There are so few of these landmark systems that allow for unlimited creation. This is the perfect toy because it is just the right level of complexity for someone starting out AND it is so ingenious in the way it is built (magnet connectors!) that I can see it being contributed to, modded, hacked, and therefore taken into completely unforeseen directions. As long as Little Bits continues to integrate improvements and release new or companion kits :)

  4. Anonymous says:

    I’m honestly a bit conflicted about this approach.  I do like the elegance and ease of use, but I’ve also seen how over-packaging keeps a wall between kids and electronics.  Also, while quite impressive, the system’s physical requirements is adding to cost apparently. 

    There seems to be this assumption that there needs to be some sort of protection between the electronics and kids wanting to learn about them, which I disagree with based on my own experience. 

    Failure is a part of learning.  I’d rather get a few extra parts for the inevitable release of magic smoke and have it be part of the experience.  But, that’s just my take on it.  I’m sure that for some, this is the way to go, and I wish every success on any project that helps demystify electronics for the masses. 

  5. Anonymous says:

    I’m honestly a bit conflicted about this approach.  I do like the elegance and ease of use, but I’ve also seen how over-packaging keeps a wall between kids and electronics.  Also, while quite impressive, the system’s physical requirements is adding to cost apparently. 

    There seems to be this assumption that there needs to be some sort of protection between the electronics and kids wanting to learn about them, which I disagree with based on my own experience. 

    Failure is a part of learning.  I’d rather get a few extra parts for the inevitable release of magic smoke and have it be part of the experience.  But, that’s just my take on it.  I’m sure that for some, this is the way to go, and I wish every success on any project that helps demystify electronics for the masses. 

  6. Anonymous says:

    I’m honestly a bit conflicted about this approach.  I do like the elegance and ease of use, but I’ve also seen how over-packaging keeps a wall between kids and electronics.  Also, while quite impressive, the system’s physical requirements is adding to cost apparently. 

    There seems to be this assumption that there needs to be some sort of protection between the electronics and kids wanting to learn about them, which I disagree with based on my own experience. 

    Failure is a part of learning.  I’d rather get a few extra parts for the inevitable release of magic smoke and have it be part of the experience.  But, that’s just my take on it.  I’m sure that for some, this is the way to go, and I wish every success on any project that helps demystify electronics for the masses. 

  7. Arno Brosi says:

    Great product!I think the box might need some work though………

  8. This seems aimed squarely at kids, yet I feel $130 is pretty pricey. You get all this and much more for half the price from an electronics learning lab kit at Radio Shack or similar.

  9. This seems aimed squarely at kids, yet I feel $130 is pretty pricey. You get all this and much more for half the price from an electronics learning lab kit at Radio Shack or similar.