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As an industrial and fine arts education center in the Bay Area, The Crucible was the perfect group to show Maker Faire Bay Area 2011 attendees demonstrations in welding, blacksmithing, and glass flameworking. Kier Lugo from the Crucible gave our cameras a close-up look at what goes into creating a beautiful piece of glassware from just a molten glob of the material.

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Check out more videos from Maker Faire Bay Area 2011.

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson is a Brooklyn-based creative technologist, Contributing Editor at MAKE, and Resident Research Fellow at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). He’s the co-author of Getting Started with Raspberry Pi and the author of Getting Started with BeagleBone.


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Comments

  1. LDM says:

    I like that you guys are doing more videos, but I’m a little disappointed that 1/3 of the video is not “Meaty” content. (10 second intro, 1m of Glassblowing video, 20 seconds credits).

  2. Anonymous says:

    Sorry for being picky, but althrough the guy correctly says glass is often referred to as an amorphous solid, then (if i understood him properly) he goes on with the same old story about it “flowing”…. the glass IS NOT technically a liquid and is not actually “moving” after it cools down… Its molecules are moving like in every other material not being at 0°K. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions (chemistry section) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass

  3. Anonymous says:

    The myth of glass being a “super cool liquid” or what ever people are saying is based on the way windows were manufactured before flat panes could be created. The glass blower would spin a Rondel (a flat plate of glass), and then would cut a square out of the circle, which usually tapered towards the outer edges of the plate, as it was spun to create the plate, and the “flowing” of the glass was really just the taper of that plate

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