The Monday Jolt

The Monday Jolt is a column about microcontrollers and electronics that appears in MAKE every Monday morning.
Raspberry Pis

Credit: Frank Carver

The Raspberry Pi isn’t just a single board any more, there are a growing number of different variants available. Unfortunately they all look rather similar, and sometimes it can be important which board is which. Fortunately there are a number of ways to figure out which board you have. One easy method is to type the following on the command line,

cat /proc/cpuinfo

which should get you something that looks a lot like this,

Processor : ARMv6-compatible processor rev 7 (v6l)
BogoMIPS : 697.95
Features : swp half thumb fastmult vfp edsp java tls 
CPU implementer : 0x41
CPU architecture: 7
CPU variant : 0x0
CPU part : 0xb76
CPU revision : 7
Hardware : BCM2708
Revision : 000f
Serial : 00000000d298cfc1

This tells us the revision code (0x0f) of the board, and from that, and the excellent work that Frank Carver has done compiling a list of what those revision codes mean, we can tell than my board is a Revision 2 Model B with; 512MB RAM, Ethernet, two USB sockets, five LEDs, mounting holes, Pin3=GPIO1, Pin5=GPIO2, Pin13=GPIO27, 12C-1, 8 extra IO pads (P5).

Interestingly, since each manufacturer of the Raspberry Pi has been assigned a unique revision number I can also tell that my board was made by Qisda, who have manufacturing sites in China, Mexico and Taiwan. Since it’s written on the board, I know my board was made in China, so it must have been manufactured in Suzhou.

Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker and tinkerer, who at the moment is spending a lot of his time thinking about the Internet of Things. In the past he has mesh networked the Moscone Center, caused a U.S. Senate hearing, and contributed to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered.