Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

Austin_Lacemakers_Guild.jpg
Maker Faire Austin wrapped up last night, and there were folks crafting, learning and sharing right up to the very end. There were so many amazing Makers and vendors, and it was awesome to walk around and watch people teaching new crafts and then seeing the light bulbs go off in the minds of the visitors. All week long I’ll be featuring highlights of the crafty side of Maker Faire. If you weren’t able to make it to Austin this year, hopefully you’ll be enticed to come next October. Enjoy!
Austin_Lacemakers_Sample1.jpg
When I first stepped into the Austin Lacemakers Guild booth, I was struck by the beauty of the tools and materials the women were using. They eagerly gave me the run down of the various styles of bobbins and pillows they were each using, and demonstrated how they use paper patterns and straight pins to create their designs. I’m still not 100% clear on how everything works, but I was certain about one thing: what they were creating was breathtaking.
Austin_Lacekmakers_Bobbins.jpg
The women were so incredibly friendly. The invited me in, answered my questions, let me gawk and take pictures and encouraged me to join their group so I could learn the skill of lacemaking (which I will absolutely take them up on!). I loved seeing fun, friendly women creating such a traditional craft in such a modern setting.
Austin_Lacemakers_Pins.jpg
But don’t think they were all dreaming of making doilies or hankie trim. One woman was creating a band of lace to add to a pair of pantaloons she’d sewn. And she wasn’t one bit shy about admitting she’d be showing them off once they were completed. I loved her saucy attitude and fun spirit.
Aside from teaching me the basics tools and methods of lacemaking, these women taught me something much more important: it’s never to late to teach a young gal old crafts. I can’t wait to try my hand at this traditional craft!


Related

Comments

  1. pomly says:

    Wow that is amazing! I had no idea that anybody did that by hand any more. I am totally confused looking at that mass of pins in the last picture. I wonder how long it takes to do that. So beautiful!

  2. Chrissy says:

    I’m so happy that this has been posted. I’ve been doing bobbin lace for years without anyone knowing what it is! It’s not as hard as it looks!

  3. Apple says:

    That looks very complicated. Those women are very talented and have a lot of time on their hands. :)

  4. MaryCorbet says:

    I’ve wanted to learn bobbin lace for years – I bought one of those introductory kits to try it out, and I liked the little bit that I learned. I’d love to find someone who teaches bobbin lace hands-on!
    The black lace with the beads is exquisite!
    And, yep, that mass of pins in the last picture is something else. How do they keep track of which pin is holding which thread!!???!!
    Nice post! Thanks for the update and the wonderful photos!

  5. MaryCorbet says:

    I’ve wanted to learn bobbin lace for years – I bought one of those introductory kits to try it out, and I liked the little bit that I learned. I’d love to find someone who teaches bobbin lace hands-on!
    The black lace with the beads is exquisite!
    And, yep, that mass of pins in the last picture is something else. How do they keep track of which pin is holding which thread!!???!!
    Nice post! Thanks for the update and the wonderful photos!