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Stuart Breidenstein of Go Robot! gave me a demo of his working stove necklace at Urban Craft Uprising this weekend in Seattle. It’s a hand-crafted brass and copper alcohol burner with a fuel line and tank. Alcohol stoves are popular for light-traveling hikers, as the fuel is readily available at hardware stores and it burns clean and hot. I I was blown away by the craftsmanship and ingenuity of this piece of functional jewelry.

Becky Stern

Becky Stern

Becky Stern is director of wearable electronics at Adafruit Industries. Her personal site: sternlab.org


7 Responses to Stove Necklace

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  1. Ryan Gillespie on said:

    I want one of these. How much would it cost to get one?
    Email me at rgill720@hotmail.com Thanks!

  2. imake1tirl on said:

    Oh. I was disappointed with the link. I was hoping less of a sale site, and more of a “this is how I made it” site.

  3. I think the Internet has spoiled. Yes, you can find how to do a lot of things but not everyone has to tell you how they do it. And not everything has to be free.

  4. I meant …has spoiled *us*

  5. An artist came up with an incredibly ingenious and beautiful little work of art, Craftzine (rightfully) thought it was cool enough to show it off, and immediately someone’s first thought is to complain because it didn’t come with free instructions for ripping it off.
    Huh. There goes the world.

  6. imake1tgirl.livejournal.com on said:

    I guess being really excited about the piece, and wanting to research replicating it because it was so damn cool just wasn’t a motivation other people considered.
    Besides, I thought the point of this site was to forward DIY info, and to encourage hands on crafting and making.
    (The comments were in reverse order. I was actually the second comment, not the first.)

  7. Becky Stern on said:

    It’s not a very simple construction; in order to show you how he made it, he’d have to teach you metalsmithing 101 first. But if you have a little metalsmithing under your belt, it’s pretty easy to see how it’s made just by looking at it. The burner itself is a domed piece of copper with strategically placed holes, set atop the rest of the base, and there’s a continuous opening between the fill nozzle and the burner for the fuel to travel.

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