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M36 TIN cookie cutter 06

Make your own custom shaped cookie cutters two ways!

Draw your cookie shape outline to use as a same-size pattern. Keep it simple: small details are OK, but bold shapes work best.

Fig. A: Measure, score, and snap!

Fig. A: Measure, score, and snap!

For metal cookie cutters, use a 0.015” aluminum sheet, available at hardware stores. Measure 1”-wide strips, then score firmly with an X-Acto knife. Bend the score against the edge of a table, then bend it back and forth until it splits. Repeat to make as many strips as needed (Figure A). Sand the edges to remove any sharp burrs.

Fig. B: Bend!

Fig. B: Bend!

Use needlenose pliers to hold the strip and carefully make bends to match your pattern (Figure B). Use a pencil or dowel inside to form tight corners. The soft aluminum bends easily and holds its shape.

Fig. C: Pop rivet!

Fig. C: Pop rivet!

Keep your bends perpendicular to the strip! To make longer strips or join the ends, drill matching 1/8” holes. Use pop rivets with backing washers to fasten strips together (Figure C). Done!

Fig D: Cut!

Fig D: Cut!

To make plastic cookie cutters, first cut your shape out of wood (Figure D), then vacuum-form plastic over it (see MAKE Volume 11, “Kitchen Floor Vacuum Former,” makezine.com/go/vacuumformer). Cut out around the shape, leaving a generous rim, then cut or grind off the top (Figure E, F).

Fig. E: Vacuum-form and trim!

Fig. E: Vacuum-form and trim!

Fig. F: Flip!

Fig. F: Flip!


Completed cookie cutters!

finished4

finished1

finished2

finished3

Preview

Buy Volume 35 for complete access or

Bob Knetzger

Bob Knetzger

Bob Knetzger ([email protected]) is an inventor/designer with 30 years of experience making fun stuff.


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