Craft & Design Technology

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-soapy writes in noting that after many months the tiny CMOS camera challenge was figured out –

“Just for closure, here’s the discussion forum thread that tells you the answers, as this was reverse engineered after a little more than 5 months.”Link.

The contest:
“This is a 640×480 pixel resolution CMOS camera used in the Samsung E700 cellular phone. While 0.3 mega pixels may not sound like a lot, this module is one of the smallest, lowest cost CMOS imaging modules currently available to the embedded market…We would like to announce a $200 prize to the first user capable of capturing an image on the new CMOS digital camera. This 640×480 camera is extremely small, low cost ($19.95), and based on proven cellular technology.”Link.

In the forums someone is trying to get it to work with a Gumstix, and an ARM+AVR combo!

14 thoughts on “Hack this CMOS tiny camera module contest complete…

  1. 19.95 isnt exactly low cost for that kind of res.. But to get it much cheaper you would need to buy many units (samsung probably pays

  2. I’m a big fan of Spark Fun, and found this contest thread awhile back, while browsing their electronics (the cam linked to the thread about REing it. It was so gripping, I read every page, and almost every comment! It was like watching pioneers creating the first space ship, or developing warp drive, and I particularly liked that each time user busonerd got farther, the group got a clearer picture of what he looked like :) So nerdily exciting! It was like receiving the first alien broadcasts – sketchy at first, and then later clearer and clearer as we honed in on the signal.

  3. hah, well even if my own projects don’t get posted here, at least the threads (over on Spark Fun’s forums) I start do! :)

  4. I don’t spose there is anyone I can convince to do all the hard work in this project for me, for the price of the materials and such?

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