Craft & Design
Graphite in the shape of weapons

weapongraphitepencils.jpg

I’m intrigued by these graphite weapon pencil sculptures by AS Batle, made from compressed graphite. Does anybody know what possible type of “proprietary binder” he may be using and in what type of mold? The site says they last for eight years if you use them for drawing. Via BB.

14 thoughts on “Graphite in the shape of weapons

  1. My guess is this is edm electrode material and he’s machining these parts on a CNC machine. Several companies make this material – Poco is one. Check out http://www.poco.com.

    In order to get the best finish in the completed mold, a very fine grain material is used. This will reduce or eliminate the need for polishing.

  2. “My guess is this is edm electrode material and he’s machining these parts on a CNC machine. Several companies make this material – Poco is one. Check out http://www.poco.com.

    In order to get the best finish in the completed mold, a very fine grain material is used. This will reduce or eliminate the need for polishing.”

    just a question. so which is it? are these cnc’d, or are they cast?

    also polishing has a lot to do with the quality of the mold. a finer mold prevents a lot of finishing work to be needed.

    the website says that they are handheld, so it must be a casting inorder for the final cost to match materials/time/profit. not that those molds for the hands would be a simple matter unless they are using a silicon mold (on further thinking)

    as for the finish, graphite is probably the most fine cheap material i can think of. it comes out of molds that shiny.

    off the top of my head you can read this: http://pubs.acs.org/cen/whatstuff/stuff/7942sci4.html

    looks like the “proprietary binder” is clay and water. although i bet you could get that shiny finish using elmer’s glue.

    1. or machining, then hand carve and polish.
      Graphite is very easily machinable. A rough shape can be given very fast.

  3. Its not machined, watch the video. The “rough” form of the hand is already smooth and has no machining marks.

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Becky Stern is a Content Creator at Autodesk/Instructables, and part time faculty at New York’s School of Visual Arts Products of Design grad program. Making and sharing are her two biggest passions, and she's created hundreds of free online DIY tutorials and videos, mostly about technology and its intersection with crafts. Find her @bekathwia on YouTube/Twitter/Instagram.

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