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LED-in-resin lamp cast from light bulb it replaces
AndyBrockhurstLEDBulbCastFromOriginal.jpg

If you can’t find a reasonably-priced LED replacement for that burned-out appliance bulb, you might do what Andy Brockhurst did: Wire up an LED cluster, yourself, and embed it in resin cast into a mold taken from the original bulb. Looks like he even painted it to match. Check out the Flickr set.

10 thoughts on “LED-in-resin lamp cast from light bulb it replaces

    1. I’m just saying that if one were to follow through to a natural conclusion, then the bulb would be installable in the appliance. In that application, how woulg the wires be used to power the bulb. Do you see my point?

      1. Yes, you’re right that isn’t very practical. You would have to drill out the original socket to pass the wire through or something. Maybe it is just an aesthetic piece.

        Re-using a glass bulbs base should be do-able, as its just replacing a portion of the cast.

  1. Yes, to make an exact screw-in LED replacement bulb it would be easy to solder to the existing socket’s contact points. Casting the mold would be tricky involving having the socket placed in the mold, but doable. I have used those cheap LED nightlight internals as a quick & easy 115VAC driver for various LED projects. I have three ultrabright blue LEDs off one removed nightlight board in an odd application for over 3 years now, 24/7.
    BTW. you’d be amazed of the 115V LED replacements now. C5, C7, and all others becoming reasonably priced too.

  2. Great idea, but the only problem with LED replacements for incandescent lamps is that they are not going to replace the lamps in such appliances as ovens.

  3. That looks like a 110v bulb… You’d have to do a bit more than what is shown to actually have a drop in replacement.

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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