Workshop
This Tabletop Has Over 5000 Pennies Embedded In It

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An Imgur user going by the name of CallofTheGame has made an extravagant table by gluing approximately 5,218 copper pennies to a door.

The process was relatively simple and started with the purchase of a 80″ x 32″ solid core birch door that was stained with a Continental shade that beautiful matched the copper color of the thousands of tiny pennies. Then the Lincoln-faced coins were sorted by levels of brightness to produce a spectacular checkered pattern which almost looks 3-dimensional when looked at at the right angle.

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Once the edges were reached, sides of the connecting pennies were cut off using a pair of handheld tin (aka aviation) snips.

Next, a two-stage epoxy which is the same material that bars use on their counters was added to the top. This was the most nerve racking part because a slight mistake could mess up the whole thing. After the included resin and the activator was mixed, the glaze was spread across the penny covered table and a hairdryer was used to get out any bubbles that surfaces.

Here are a few of the process pictures. For the rest of the pictures and the explanations of what exactly is being done, you’ll have to go to the Imgur gallery for this project.

Interestingly enough, one penny was turned upside down to drive any perfectionist friends guessing where it could be.

The result is an amazing work of craftsmanship that would fit well in any home. Now, see if you can find that one turned up penny. Let us know in the comments if you discover where it is!

 

0 thoughts on “This Tabletop Has Over 5000 Pennies Embedded In It

  1. how much does it weigh? I calculate the pennies weigh just under 30 pounds, the door weighs in at about 65 pounds plus epoxy and legs. Can it be moved easily?

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I'm a virtual reality, wearables, and technology art journalist who focuses on emerging trends in the maker, hacker, and inventor cultures. I like to travel around from place to place researching what is being made.

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