The Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) runs a free program that allows creators to certify that their hardware complies with the community definition of open source hardware.  Whenever you see the certification logo, you know that the certified hardware meets this standard.

The certification site includes a full list of all of the certified open source hardware.  Here is all of the hardware that was certified in January, which comes from Australia, Ecuador, India, Japan, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States. The hardware from Ecuador and Turkey are the first pieces of certified open source hardware from those countries.

The PewPew M4 from Switzerland is a game console for teaching programming using CircuitPython.  It helps teach people to code by providing them an easy way to build handheld games on open source hardware.

For the third month in a row Field Ready certified so many pieces of hardware ready to be deployed in a disaster area that listing them individually would crash your browser.  Their hardware includes tweezers, a ventilator connector, an otoscope specula, an IV bag hook, an umbilical cord clamp, and more. Check out the directory for everything.

Looking for the perfect accessory for your next soiree?  The Bow Tie PCB Badge may be just the thing you need.  Powered by a single 3V CR2032 battery, this bit of open source hardware will help your outfit sparkle.

The ATM90E26 Featherwing is an advanced energy monitor featherwing capable of class-1 operation with the appropriate current transformer and potential transformer powering it.

The UWB Feather incorporates the Decawave DWM1000 module and an ATSAMD21 ARM Corex M0 into the Adafruit feather form-factor for projects requiring localization or wireless distancing.

Is this the most exciting hardware certified in December? The 2020 Open Hardware Summit Badge is a wrist-watch form-factor badge for the 2020 Open Hardware Summit (March 13 in NYC).  It has a Nordic nRF52840 microcontroller capable of running CircuitPython, a 1.53″ IPS LCD, and several sensors.  Want one? Tickets to the Summit are still available.

Need a 24-bit stereo audio DAC for your Raspberry Pi?  The MAXII – 24-Bit Stereo Audio DAC has you covered. This CPLD-based implementation of a 24-bit stereo DAC is specifically built for the Raspberry Pi.

The first piece of open source hardware from Ecuador, the Unode is a platform for IOT applications based on a Nordic NRF52 core.  It compliments the NoDebt, a bluetooth node that has sensors from IOT products.

The BB Q10 Keyboard PMOD uses a ATSAMD20 chip to poll the keyboard and put key press information into a FIFO.  An I2C interface can be used to read the FIFO, configure some of the functionality of the chip, and control the keyboard backlight. The key information can be received using polling or interrupts.

The Alchemy49 is a replacement pcb for the Magicforce 49 supporting south facing Switches, LEDs, PCB mounted stabilizers and QMK. It’s built around the SparkFun Pro Micro and designed to be easy to put together and solder using only one surface mount component.

January brought 2 accessories for the Chirimen hardware control platform from Japan.  The RPI3GPOITESTER is a test board for the Chirimen that can double as a breakout board for the Raspberry Pi.  The Temp Sensor for Chirimen is, as you might expect, a ADT7410 temperature sensor for the Chirimen with a grove connector.

The first certified open source hardware from Turkey is the STM32 DS2480 EMU.  It is a DS2480 Serial to 1-Wire LineDriver Emulation On STM32.

Finally, the Orange Crab is an FPGA development platform featuring a Lattice ECP5 FPGA, DDR3 memory in an Adafruit Feather Form Factor.