wrkshpWhenever I speak to someone who is not part of the maker community and share various projects that I am working on, I usually get the same melancholy reply, “I wish I had the time to do stuff like that.” At first, it made me feel somewhat privileged to be able to do something on a semi-regular basis that I’m so passionate about, but after hearing this continuously for the past year, my feelings on the matter are quite different.

At first, it genuinely appeared that people are just insanely busy. And while there is a degree of truth to that, I came to understand that the reality of the situation is really quite different.

What I discovered is that those people didn’t really want to build or make things… yet. When we are passionate about something, we make the time to do it. Some of the busiest people I have met are makers who have full-time jobs that involve something other than making. No one gives us extra time to make and do the things that we are passionate about — we create opportunities, find the funds, and turn those aspirations into a reality.

So here are 5 ways you can find time to make:

P.I. Workshop

Josh Price and Son

1. If part of your reason for not having time to make is due to parental responsibilities, then get your kids involved. Josh Price from the Pi Workshop contributed to this topic in a recent conversation, “I try and involve my kids when I can and when it is safe (6, 2, & 8 months). They each have their own set of earmuffs and glasses. And my oldest is featured in almost all of my YouTube videos. Remember to keep your priorities straight and fold your crew in where you can so it is a family affair.”

2. Wait until everyone goes to bed. The most common response from most people I spoke to on the subject said that they were able to put in time between the hours of 10pm-2am. But if you are one of those late night makers, please be careful, the chance of accidents and injuries go up dramatically with tiredness and fatigue

3. Make a plan. Break your projects down into smaller steps so that when you do have time, you know exactly what needs to be done — thus making more efficient use of your time.

Mark O'Keefe Jr.

Working together on home renovation

4. Get your spouse involved. Making together can be an extremely positive activity that can bring some couples closer together and just maybe be enough to convince your significant other to let you get that next new machine.

5. Set aside time on the weekends. Dedicate just a portion of your weekend to working on your projects. If you can consistently set a time for this, then you can better schedule your weekend activities around it. This might prolong your projects, but at least you will be working towards the completion of something you love.

If you really want to be a maker, then find other like-minded people, carve out some time and get to it.