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Steve Hobley

Steve Hobley

This week, I have been mostly working on...

I've been tinkering around with bits of technology since I was five years old. I used to take the telephone apart at home, just to see how it worked.

After a couple of years I could even put it back together again - and sometimes it would continue to work.

Latest from Steve Hobley

With an estimated one billion 555 timers manufactured annually, you know this component must be versatile! We’re going to learn how to build and control drivers for three very different types of motors using a breadboard, resistors, diodes, transistors, and some 555 timers (along with a sprinkling of CMOS logic).... Read more »

In this project, we’ll turn a MAKE MintDuino microcontroller and a Mintronics Survival Pack into a replica of retro electronic memory games like Simon and the Tandy Pocket Repeat game sold by RadioShack in the 1980s. It’s amazing how fun and addictive this simple game is, and it’s a great... Read more »

In this project, taken from Charles Platt’s book Make: Electronics, we’re going to breadboard a fairly complex circuit using 555 timers and an OR logic gate. Using these and some other, common components, we’ll build a game show button system. When one button is pressed, it automatically locks the other... Read more »

Charge up your USB devices with the power of the sun. By adding a small solar panel and two diodes to a standard USB cable, you can plug that cable into USB devices needing a recharge. It’s so easy. Let’s get started. The Solar USB Charger being tested on a... Read more »

Who hasn’t dreamed about owning their own metal detector and searching for buried treasure, or at least a few dropped coins? In this project, we will build a metal detector based on a dual oscillator circuit. One oscillator is fixed, and the other varies depending upon the proximity of metal... Read more »

This simple, wearable circuit uses an operational amplifier (or "op-amp") chip to convert sound into light. An LM324 op-amp and a transistor boost input from a mini condenser microphone to light a series of LEDs. Watch it blink to the beat of your favorite music. Check out more Weekend Projects. Read more »

555 ball whacker

This project uses a simple 555 timer chip and a feedback loop to control a servo-controlled wooden arm. Whenever an object comes close to a photosensor mounted on the end of the arm, it blocks the amount of light detected, which triggers the arm to swat the object away. Read more »