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Meet Experiment Boy at Saint-Malo Mini Maker Faire

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This post is coming to you live from the Saint-Malo Mini Maker Faire in France, being held all weekend at the Quai Duguay-Trouin.

There are any number of channels on YouTube that try to make science fun, but almost all of them are in English, and most of those are created by Americans. That sometimes can leave the “rest of the world” feeling out in the cold, there is however only one “Experiment Boy” — with over 200,000 french speaking subscribers and 13 million views — his channel is where you go to make science fun if you’re French.

I sat down and talked to YouTube creator Baptiste Mortier-Dumont, perhaps better known as “Experiment Boy,” although I did have to fight through a crowd of fans to do it, at times it seemed all 200,000 of his subscribers were standing in front of his stall here at the faire.

YouTube creator Experiment Boy signs posters for his fans while showing off his builds at the Maker Faire in Saint Malo.
YouTube creator Experiment Boy signs posters for his fans while showing off his builds at the Maker Faire in Saint Malo.

If your French is up to it, and you’re interested in a European spin on making science fun, you should watch.

Of course, if your French isn’t up to it, you can always watch for the explosions. There are lots. Promise.

3 thoughts on “Meet Experiment Boy at Saint-Malo Mini Maker Faire

  1. egth . I see what you mean… Clarence `s blurb is terrific, on friday I bought a great new Dodge after having made $4460 this past 4 weeks and-just over, 10k this past month . without a doubt its the most-comfortable work Ive had .

    I started this seven months/ago and almost straight away began to bring home at least $70, per/hr . over at this website HERE’S MORE DETAIL

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Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker and tinkerer, who is spending a lot of his time thinking about the Internet of Things. In the past he has mesh networked the Moscone Center, caused a U.S. Senate hearing, and contributed to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered.

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