HOW TO – macro lens hack

Photography & Video
HOW TO – macro lens hack

Macro Screwpoint
From the MAKE Flickr photo pool

C.Barr captured some extreme macro shots using 55-250 and 50mm lens mated together, a trick picked up from this video tutorial –

Could be a fun hack if you have the necessary lens around – if not, there are plenty of other options we’ve covered here before.

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20 thoughts on “HOW TO – macro lens hack

  1. xxoo says:

    “How to create the illusion of high-resolution macrophotography: Step 1: Begin by using a high-resolution macroscopic photograph. Step 2: Done.”

    haha, real leet hax there.

  2. Collin Cunningham says:

    … and the illusion of superiority is just as easy to create by accusing someone ofcheating.

    xxoo, keep it constructive please.

  3. Brendon says:

    I added this one to the Make Group. It’s actually pretty easy to do, I ended up using my tripod to help with shaking.

    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3243/2902653150_af41bc2683_b.jpg

    Brendon

  4. slonkak says:

    What was the point of the UV filter? He never said why he “wasn’t concerned.” Without them will bad things happen?

  5. comment anonymously? says:

    UV filters serve no (positive) optical purpose on a digital SLR. However they protect the front of the lens, which is what he was concerned about – lenses scratching each other.

    Anyone know why you use a 100mm-50mm combo, and what other combinations work?

  6. Jachym says:

    …is there to protect the lenses from scratching each other. In worst case, you end up replacing a UV filter worth a couple of bucks…otherwise you would have to replace both lenses, which would end up being much more expensive.

  7. Patrick says:

    Sweet, I have both those lenses. And almost that camera.

  8. cdreid says:

    In fact just reversing a good telephoto on your camera will work. Take a 300mm. hand hold it in front of your slr and snap you’ll be amazed.

  9. ProDigi says:

    On a reversed lens set-up, an inverted lens with a wider or lower focal length number will yield greater magnification. Higher focal lengths above 50mm will not produce enough magnification. To calculate the ratio, you just divide the focal length values of the coupled lens like this: lens A / lens B = magnification ratio. For example, a reversed coupled 200mm/50mm will give you 4:1 magnification ratio (200/50=4 or 4:1). While a 100mm/50mm combo will give you a ratio of 2:1. Imagine if you combine a 200mm with an inverted 24mm prime it will give you a ratio around 8.3:1… ;-)

  10. ProDigi says:

    On a reversed lens set-up, an inverted lens with a wider or lower focal length number will yield greater magnification. Higher focal lengths above 50mm will not produce enough magnification. To calculate the ratio, you just divide the focal length values of the coupled lens like this: lens A / lens B = magnification ratio. For example, a reversed coupled 200mm/50mm will give you 4:1 magnification ratio (200/50=4 or 4:1). While a 100mm/50mm combo will give you a ratio of 2:1. Imagine if you combine a 200mm with an inverted 24mm prime it will give you a ratio around 8.3:1… ;-)

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