Recycle Your Own Plastic With Precious Plastic

3D Printing & Imaging
Recycle Your Own Plastic With Precious Plastic
Precious Plastic designed open-source machines recycle old plastic into new objects
Precious Plastic designed open-source machines recycle old plastic into new objects

Even though we have recycling centers, plastic trash is still a big issue. It can be found in every nook and cranny, even in remote locations! In a deep wood park, at the farthest reaches of a gorge, there sat some plastic bags and wrappers. The end of that adventure was depressing.

Only about 10% of what we throw away actually gets recycled. What if we could recycle our plastic trash at home and 3D print it out into things we can use. Now we can, thanks to Dutch designer Dave Hakkens, whose Precious Plastic initiative makes use of new open-sourced machines to turn unwanted plastic into renewed goods. Dave designed several machines using scrap material and sheet metal that can be found in almost any scrap yard.

Each machine recycles plastic material using different methods and includes a rotational molding device, and extrusion machine and an injection-molding machine along with a simple shredder. Dave doesn’t envision these machines as consumer products but rather used in small communities where people can be reimbursed for their plastic waste and then the recycling center can make new purchasable goods. Those interested in building their own machines can get the blueprints from the Precious Plastic website.

The options…

The Injection Molding Machine allows users to manually press heated plastic into new molds
The Injection Molding Machine allows users to manually press heated plastic into new molds
The Rotation Machine is actually rotational oven that heats the plastic to form hollow objects.
The Rotation Machine is actually rotational oven that heats the plastic to form hollow objects
The Extrusion Machine uses a screw to press the plastic through a heating element to form a line of molded plastic.
The Extrusion Machine uses a screw to press the plastic through a heating element to form a line of molded plastic

While these designs aren’t specifically focused on making plastics for 3d printing, minor modifications could probably be made to turn this into a filament extruder, like the filastruder.

8 thoughts on “Recycle Your Own Plastic With Precious Plastic

  1. D Finch says:

    And what about the unfriendly toxic fumes involved with any kind of plastic heating/melting?

    1. TVulgaris says:

      Exactly what we’ve come up with in the past 160 years since synthetic polymers were developed?

    2. Phillip Jubb says:

      They didn’t say it was a “clean” process. The website shows them in a workshop, not a bedroom.

    3. svartalf says:

      There’s all sorts of “unfriendly toxic fumes” from things you’d not contemplate twice about in your or someone else’s house. Ranges from nail polish/nail polish remover to the furniture and bedding you’d not even give a second thought about.

      As for this…heh…like Phillip says there, it’s not a clean process- but it wasn’t one making your furniture, flooring, etc. If you’re not taking proper precautions…it’s not MY problem. And if you’ve got one, I’ve got a shipping address you can ship all your modern conveniences including the computer you posted that stuff with, since you’re clearly too cautious for words and don’t rate anything except a padded cell to protect you from everything.

  2. DamOTclese2 says:

    What idiot, stupid notions. Good grief, what dumbfuck is going to believe this shit?

    1. svartalf says:

      Heh… It’s recyclable plastics he’s processing. Shred the stuff up, melt it back down and re-use. HDPE is pretty re-usable, all things considered- and it looks like he’s processing that. Might want to re-assess who’s the “dumbfuck”, there.

  3. robert says:

    Een ander mooi initiatief is http://www.plasticfantastic.nu Het lokaal verwerken van plastic afval naar nuttig eindproduct. Hierbij gebruik makend van alle soorten plastic

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