New in the Maker Shed: 4-Bit Microcomputer Kit

Education Technology
New in the Maker Shed: 4-Bit Microcomputer Kit
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The 4-Bit Microcomputer Kit from Gakken features a 20-key keypad, a 7-segment LED, and 7 individual LEDs. It comes pre-programmed with 7 different applications, and you can even program your own via the keypad. It’s a fun retro kit, just begging to be hacked! Don’t forget to check out Gakken magazine 4-bit computer rollout party in Tokyo.

4 thoughts on “New in the Maker Shed: 4-Bit Microcomputer Kit

  1. Dynamo Dan says:

    Hi Folks:

    I can almost guarantee you that this is the very same platform that the Science Fair Microcomputer Trainer used, which was a special version of the TMS1100 by Texas Instruments. This chip was used in a huge variety of toys in the 70s and 80s, such as the Speak and Spell. A nice writeup on the Microcomputer Trainer is here:

    http://www.old-computers.com/MUSEUM/computer.asp?st=1&c=1053

    I used to own the Microcomputer Trainer, and still have the chip and the manual from it. I immediately recognized the design pattern: 20-button keyboard (16 hex and 4 other), a 7-segment LED, a 7-led register display, and a speaker. I would be so happy to know if the manual from the microcomputer trainer is applicable to this new kit from Gakken.

  2. solder guy says:

    Yes .. the Tandy / Radio Shack Microcomputer Trainer and the Gakken GMC-4 are electronically the same .. separated by 3 decades of time. (Your post here led me to the GMC-4!)

    See this knol where you can find the Japanese manual:

    http://knol.google.com/k/curtis-hoffmann/programming-the-gakken-gmc-4/2orqqohq0ljio/10#

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