Flashback: Rustic Wood Side Table

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Rustic, woodsy design is my absolute favorite, and I love working with found materials. This week’s flashback is the perfect combo of both: the Rustic Wood Side Table by Joe Szuecs from the pages of CRAFT Volume 08. In the intro, Joe writes:

I had a dying madrone (Arbutus menziesii) in my backyard. Looking at its structure, I noticed a nice 3-pronged junction of branches a few feet above my head. I thought this would make a nice tripod base for a small side table, so with a bit of trial and error and a slice of another tree trunk for the top, this little rustic side table was born.

The antithesis to mass-produced commercial goods, this piece is funky and original by definition, made with found forest objects. It comes with a guarantee that no one else will have one just like it.

Joe goes on to teach us how to look for the perfect branch junction for the base. Here’s a picture of the one he started with:
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Then, with a nice slice of trunk for the top, some basic hardware to attach the two, and a bit of serious sanding, you end up with a one-of-a-kind beautiful table that will last you years.
Here’s the full tutorial in our Digital Edition. And you can still pick up a back issue of CRAFT Volume 08 in the Maker Shed.

6 thoughts on “Flashback: Rustic Wood Side Table

  1. ygg says:

    table is nice, but any idea what the fabric is on that chair???

  2. Anonymous says:

    i’ve been searching online for that fabric but can’t find it – i’d love to know where it came from

  3. ckm says:

    nice table….. v. v. v. v. v. v. v. v. v. v. unique@@@@@ like totally where can i like buy one because like it is soooooo sexi

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I'm a word nerd who loves to geek out on how emerging technology affects the lexicon. I was an editor on the first 40 volumes of MAKE, and I love shining light on the incredible makers in our community. In particular, covering art is my passion — after all, art is the first thing most of us ever made. When not fawning over perfect word choices, I can be found on the nearest mountain, looking for untouched powder fields and ideal alpine lakes.

Contact me at snowgoli@gmail.com or via @snowgoli.

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