EyeWhere – electrooculargram (EOG) kit

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EyeWhere – electrooculargram (EOG) kit

Eyemouse Prototype
Interesting PIC based project that can use your eyeball to move a mouse around –

EyeWhere is an electrooculargram (EOG) that will allow your eye position to dictate the position of a cursor on a computer screen.

At the moment, only the schematic, parts list, and PCB patterns are available. The price is $19.95. The total cost for the parts is approximately $75. The parts are not available here. If you wish to order the parts, you should check an electronic component vendor such as Digikey.

EyeWhere – Link.

2 thoughts on “EyeWhere – electrooculargram (EOG) kit

  1. abend says:

    Reading the page, I’m not too impressed. $20 gets you a zip file containing a schematic, BOM, and PCB art.

    In order to make it do something (anything), you need to write the code for the PIC and write the driver for the computer.

    In other words, you are paying $20 for a schematic for connecting IR photodiodes to a microcontroller. The information to do this is available for free.

    Hopefully, though, seeing this will inspire someone to build an open source/free version.

    According to this:
    http://web.media.mit.edu/~alockerd/papers/selker-eyer-chi01.pdf
    you can detect eye position using IR reflection /absorption by the pupil. They use a PIC, no code available.

    This: http://www.iovs.org/cgi/reprint/28/6/1018.pdf has a bunch of technical detail about how to improve the design of your IR photodiode-based eye position detector.

    This paper: http://www.iovs.org/cgi/reprint/14/4/317.pdf is on using photodiodes mounted on a pair of glasses to detect saccades (in someone whose head is being held still).

    The eye-are project from MIT is also similar to this. If anyone wants to get into this stuff in a big way, there are a lot of papers on the internet, just search “infrared oculography”, or the webcam-based version “video oculography”

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