MintyBoost! Kit V1.1

Technology
MintyBoost! Kit V1.1

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Here’s another one of our kits with instructions, up on Instructables –

This is an updated version of the detailed instructable by this device’s inventor, Ladyada. The updated version has some extra components. Also if you’re having trouble be sure to read the extra section in step 4 about modifying the MintyBoost to work with some newer MP3 players. (It’s quite simple).

MintyBoost! Kit V1.1 – Link & get on @ the Maker store.

12 thoughts on “MintyBoost! Kit V1.1

  1. Oracle1729 says:

    This is pre-assembled using surface mount, so it’s much,much smaller:

    http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8249

    It’s also half the price (though you’ll still need to add a USB plug and altoids gum tin).

    There’s a 1-cell version for the same price.

  2. philliptorrone says:

    oracle, that’s a good one for power for more advanced folks i think.

    the mintyboost is a learning kit – a surface mount pre-assembled product isn’t the same.

    there also aren’t instructions on how to add usb, it hasn’t been tested with all the devices the mintyboost has.

  3. Oracle1729 says:

    Phil, I love the mintyboost kit ever since I read limor’s very detailed write-up. You might have a point about it being a learning kit, but it’s so simple it’s not much of a project to assemble, even for a beginner.

    One thing I never understood about the posts here though, why do you feel it’s necessary to test a power supply with every device? The SFE unit will deliver 5 volts with 3% ripple at up to 200mA. That’s all you need to know to know if it will work with your device. That’s the whole purpose of power ratings. Do you think there’s any 5 volt sub-200mA device that the mintyboost couldn’t power?

  4. philliptorrone says:

    >>Phil, I love the mintyboost kit ever since I read limor’s very detailed write-up. You might have a point about it being a learning kit, but it’s so simple it’s not much of a project to assemble, even for a beginner.

    i’ve had 40+ year old men and women say that even the mintyboost was too hard, but luckily it was in person and we helped them build confidence with a soldering iron. not everyone thinks soldering is easy, most people can go through life and never solder or put parts on a board – so i don’t think i agree it’s so simple (for everyone).

    >>One thing I never understood about the posts here though, why do you feel it’s necessary to test a power supply with every device? The SFE unit will deliver 5 volts with 3% ripple at up to 200mA. That’s all you need to know to know if it will work with your device. That’s the whole purpose of power ratings. Do you think there’s any 5 volt sub-200mA device that the mintyboost couldn’t power?

    this is a good question, and when the mintyboost was first built we -didnt- test it with all devices because we figured ‘5v is 5v is 5v”. however, the 2 usb datalines (d+ and d-) are actually really important: depending on whether they are pulled high/low/floating. for example, older ipods were happy when d+ was pulled low and d- was pulled high. newer ones will only work with both pulled high, through a 15k resistor. of course, many devices don’t care a whit, but since so many people use these sorts of devices with mp3 players, its important to go though and test them all.

    did you see the bottom of http://www.ladyada.net/make/mintyboost/make.html “Pull-ups and Pull-down customization”? it has it all there.

    oh, did you notice that the spe product you linked to says “patent pending” ? that sorta wigs me out, that means it’s not educational and you really can’t learn from it or do other stuff with it like you can with open source hardware kits.

    our kits are open source, supporting open source hardware efforts is good i think.

  5. niwnfyc says:

    How does it work out with projects like this, and the Life project designed by Dropout Design?

    Does Ladyada and Dropout Design get a cut from the profits you make from the kits you sell on your website?

    Please don’t tell me you take their projects, slap your logo on there like its your own design, and sell them for your own profit.

    Although, I suppose under Creative Commons, you have every right to do that.

  6. philliptorrone says:

    @niwnfyc – no, we don’t do that. ladyada is on the tech advisory board, writes articles and sells *us* kits for the MAKE store. we work with our kit makers to get branded versions with MAKE on them, or co-develop kits – many kit makers have great businesses working with us.

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