SparkFun Drone Contest Recap with Chris Anderson

Robotics Technology
SparkFun Drone Contest Recap with Chris Anderson

The New York Times has produced an entertaining recap vid of last month’s Autonomous Vehicle Competition, hosted by our pals at SparkFun. It’s narrated by WIRED’s Chris Anderson, who is also the founder and chairman of DIY Drones. The contest embraces three classes of autonomous outdoor vehicles—roughly, wheeled, winged, and with rotors. [Thanks, Daniel!]

20 thoughts on “SparkFun Drone Contest Recap with Chris Anderson

  1. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  2. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  3. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  4. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  5. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  6. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  7. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  8. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  9. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

  10. Daniel Kim says:

    I used to work for the college of agriculture at New Mexico State University.  One tool used by an entomologist here was a kite with a camera (shades of the first issue of Make), which let him survey a field for areas with insect damage.  From the ground, it’s hard to distinguish a pattern of infestation, but from the air these patterns show up like a sore thumb.  He paid a ton of money for this rig.  I thought that a R/C helicopter with camera would have been even better, and one of these autonomous quadrotors would be ideal.

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I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I am a long-time contributor to MAKE magazine and makezine.com. My work has also appeared in ReadyMade, c't – Magazin für Computertechnik, and The Wall Street Journal.

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